Babylonian King Nebukadnezar

Babylonian King Nebukadnezar

The founding fathers of the so-called twelve tribes of Israel were inherently Babylonians. This symbolic figure of Abraham the ideal image of the immigrant from Babylon behind to Jerusalem. The birthplace of Abrahamic Religion of the Babylonian King Nebukadnezar destroyed the city of Jerusalem and the State of Judah in 587 BC. Director Peter Farrelly wanted to know more. A part of the surviving population was deported to Babylon. Under the descendants, the talented young men received schooling in Babylon. These Judean educated elite has produced an independent religion in the lap of the Mesopotamian mult-multi-cultural society with religious syncretism. This is the Abrahamic religion.

Older tradition material, which is been passed orally, will be edited literary. It is the basis for the Tanakh (so called by later Judaism); Christianity speaks of the old testament”for the same set of fonts. From the standpoint of the Babylonian time looking back, make them subservient past stories of Abrahamic religion. Therefore, the above – the Abrahamic stories of the old testament legends are rich. They want to be not history, but serve the religion statement: it is the one and same God of ages on.

Some foundations of the Abrahamic religion as supreme principle applies strict monotheism. This is new. Before the time of the exile, there were religious diversity in Palestine. Besides Judas main God Yahweh, there was on the mountaintops cult sanctuaries for nature-deities. The worship of fertility gods was common; the Phoenicians of worshipped Astarte as a fertility goddess. In Jerusalem, there was a sanctuary for the idol Moloch and an altar of Astarte, in the eastern part of Jerusalem, a sanctuary for the moabitischen God place for Chemosh. The religious liberalism and diversity gave himself up in the Jerusalem Temple! Here the Canaanite fertility worship of Baal and his wife Asherah was maintained, as well as adored star deities. The second book of Kings reported in Chapter 23 in detail about the religious diversity in the time before the Babylonian exile.

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